Father Scecina Magazine Winter 2015 Special Edition

Father Scecina Magazine 2015

This special edition of the Father Scecina Magazine focuses on history. History fascinates almost everyone. We love the History Channel. We love watching movies like “Unbroken” and television documentaries on the Roosevelts. Books like “American Sniper,” recently made into a feature film, fascinate us.

Our new Scecina Story project satisfies our desire to learn about our origins and traditions. More importantly, they inspire us. I invite each of you to visit the school, see our tributes to Father Thomas Scecina and the Sisters of Saint Francis Oldenburg on the first floor of the main building and reflect on the stories that are told.

So why do we study history? And why are we making a big deal out of the life and death of Father Scecina, the school’s namesake, and the decades of service from the Sisters of Saint Francis Oldenburg? After all, Father Scecina never stepped foot on this campus and the Sisters are no longer here. Why now?

The answers are pretty straightforward, and at Scecina we think history will help our students understand their place as Christians walking in a world of constant change.

The study of history shows us what it means to be human. Through history we see the good and the bad aspects of humanity. To paraphrase the historian R.G. Collingwood, “History is for human self-knowledge. The only clue to what women and men can do is what women and men have done.” In telling the stories of Father Scecina and the Sisters of Saint Francis Oldenburg, we are calling attention to them. Most importantly, we are saying it is possible to live in service to God and others.

History helps us be better citizens. Thomas Jefferson thought history was very important for educating citizens. As citizens, it is important to remember that 1,792 American prisoners of war died on the Arisan Maru at the end of World War II. Father Scecina administered last rites to many U.S. POWs before the ship sank. He died with them. These men were the heroes of Bataan, Corregidor, and the Philippine campaign. What does this teach us about being citizens? Freedom is not free.

History helps us see things over time. It helps us see ourselves as part of something bigger than we are. For Christians, the Incarnation—Christ coming into the world—is the most important event in human history. Father Scecina is part of that continuing story. He gave his life for his friends. To recognize his service to God, country and his friends, the Archdiocese of Indianapolis named our high school after him. Over 800 years ago, St. Francis of Assisi founded the Franciscan movement to follow Christ by living the Gospels. The Sisters of Saint Francis Oldenburg are part of that story. The Scecina community, all 7,500 plus, are part of these continuing stories.

I am grateful to the sponsors of the Scecina Story project. Without their support we would not be able to tell the stories of Father Scecina and the Sisters of Saint Francis Oldenburg. I also am grateful for the support of the Scecina Veterans Committee and its efforts to raise money for the bust of Father Scecina. These are your stories, my story, our stories.

God Bless,

Joe Therber
President

P.S. To view the new special edition of the Father Scecina Magazine 2015 and Annual Report, please click here.